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The Penny Green Series

A series of mysteries set in late 19th century London and featuring the intrepid Fleet Street reporter Penny Green. The books can be read in any order. See all of Emily's books

Tragedy at Piddleton Hotel by Emily Organ
Death in the Workhouse by Emily Organ
An Unwelcome Guest by Emily Organ
Limelight by Emily Organ a Victorian mystery
Emily Organ Writer

Emily Organ Writer

Writer
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Author of historical mysteries and thrillers.

Emily Organ Writer

Emily Organ Writer

1 week 15 hours ago

A mysterious, ancient stone is one of the locations in PG9 πŸ“˜ Cannon Street, in the City of London, has been home to London Stone for 1,000 years and possibly much longer. No one knows the true origins of London Stone, there’s speculation that it was once a Roman milestone - possibly a location from where all distances in Roman Britain were measured. It has also been suggested that the stone is prehistoric and was an object of Druidic worship. It was first referenced in a list of London properties written around the year 1100. In medieval times, London Stone was a popular place to visit and countless stories were concocted about its origin. In 1598 the historian, John Stow, described it as "pitched upright... fixed in the ground verie deep, fastned with bars of iron.” Some event (perhaps the Great Fire of London) caused the stone to reduce in size and in the 18th century it was moved across the road and placed in a protective cupola in front of St Swithin’s Church. There it stayed for 200 years until the church was destroyed in The Blitz in WWII. An office building replaced the church and a new protective…

Emily Organ Writer

Emily Organ Writer

1 week 4 days ago

London’s most haunted house surely deserves a mention on Halloween! πŸŽƒ It’s 50 Berkeley Square in Mayfair (a location in The Inventor). The Victorians, lovers of ghost stories, believed the house to be very haunted indeed. πŸ‘» In 1881 it was reported that a housemaid woke everyone with her shrieks at midnight: β€œHer eyes were fixed with a stare of expressive terror, upon a remote corner of the chamber, and an agony of fear seemed to possess her, yet the bystanders saw nothing.” The poor maid reportedly died at St George’s Hospital the next day. A friend of the family then insisted on staying in the same room: β€œAt midnight he rang and was found also in convulsions. He never revealed the secret of the chamber.” πŸ’€ The ghost stories of 50 Berkeley Square originated with a variety of tales including a young woman throwing herself from a top window, a young man being locked in the attic and a young girl being murdered in the attic. From 1859- 1870 a man who had been rejected by his fiancΓ©e lived in the house and supposedly went mad and died there. The house fell into disrepair at this time - enhancing…

Emily Organ Writer

Emily Organ Writer

2 weeks 6 days ago

A location from Penny Green 9! This building used to be the Central London District Poor Law Schools which opened in 1857 to house and educate destitute children. It was also known as the Cuckoo Schools as the two schools (one for girls, one for boys) were built on land called Cuckoo Farm in Hanwell, west London. Charlie Chaplin had a poverty stricken childhood and joined the school in 1896 when he was just seven years old. He spent two unhappy years there before moving to another similar school in south London. At the age of 14 he registered with a London theatrical agency and his life took a different turn 🎭 The school closed in 1933 and the buildings are now a community centre.

Emily Organ Writer

Emily Organ Writer

3 weeks 2 days ago

Another London pic from this week - I love it when an effort is made to preserve old signs. This is on a building in Monmouth St in the West End. Horse clothing! πŸ˜‚

Emily Organ Writer

Emily Organ Writer

3 weeks 4 days ago

No trip to London is complete without a visit to a Penny Green location! I took this photo of Seven Dials earlier this week, you may remember that it features in The Rookery. Seven streets radiate out from this point, only three are visible in this picture - I found it difficult to get a good photo of it! Originally laid out in the 17th century, this area became part of the notorious slum, St Giles Rookery, by the 19th century. Dickens and Keats referenced Seven Dials in their work and my favourite author, Agatha Christie, wrote The Seven Dials Mystery. These days the area is much cleaned up and has a new column based on the original 17th century one - it was reinstated in 1989 and acts as a traffic island these days. Only a few buildings from the 17th century development remain, but it’s still worth a visit.

Emily Organ Writer

Emily Organ Writer

3 weeks 6 days ago

I had an amazing evening at the Amazon Kindle Storyteller Awards last night and a big congratulations to Ian W. Sainsbury for being crowned the winner! It was an honour to be shortlisted and brilliant to meet lots of other writers too πŸ˜ƒ

Emily Organ Writer

1 month 4 days ago

I'm visiting my local radio station - Kennet Radio - today to talk about the Kindle Storyteller Award - on air at 6pm UK timeπŸŽ™

Emily Organ Writer

Emily Organ Writer

1 month 1 week ago

Death at the Workhouse is now available in paperback πŸ˜€ This link should take you to the relevant store, let me know if it plays up: http://hyperurl.co/pdr6gn

Emily Organ Writer

Emily Organ Writer

1 month 1 week ago

Recognise this famous crime? The British Newspaper Archive is one of my favourite sources for research because reading contemporary accounts gives you an almost first-hand experience of the events, and attitudes, of the time. That's not to say that newspapers reported everything accurately in the 19th century, they frequently got their facts wrong (like these days πŸ˜‚) - but there's something fascinating about reading the very first reports of incidents that have since become infamous historical events. Clue: this newspaper clipping is from 131 years ago, but you've probably guessed the crime anyway πŸ˜ƒ

Emily Organ Writer

Emily Organ Writer

1 month 2 weeks ago

If you've read all the Penny Green books then you may have noticed a location I've used more than once! St Bartholomew's Hospital remains on the site it was founded on in 1123 and some of its buildings date back to the 18th century. Its intriguing pathology museum features in The Inventor and recently opened to the public. The 18th century Hogarth Stair is a grand staircase with walls decorated by the artist William Hogarth. Another William - Scottish freedom fighter William Wallace - was hanged, drawn and quartered in West Smithfield in front of the hospital in 1305. A commemorative plaque marks the rough location. I worked at Barts in the late 90s and used to sneak off to visit the pathology museum and the Hogarth paintings in my lunch break. There were also some interesting tunnels which I believe were for the nurses to travel between their accommodation and the wards. And a slightly creepy underground swimming pool too. My office had once been a nurse's bedroom, that building has been demolished now. It's a fascinating place and still a busy, working hospital too πŸ₯