The Penny Green Series

A series of mysteries set in late 19th century London and featuring the intrepid Fleet Street reporter Penny Green. The books can be read in any order. See all of Emily's books

The Bermondsey Poisoner by Emily Organ
Limelight by Emily Organ a Victorian mystery
The Rookery by Emily Organ
The Maids Secret by Emily Organ
Emily Organ Writer

Emily Organ Writer

1 week 4 hours ago

Penny Green 6 - The Bermondsey Poisoner is now available on pre-order! πŸŽ‰ Special pre-order price of 99c / 99p, publication date is December 14th. Get your copy now πŸ˜ƒ Edited to say - paperback will follow shortly after πŸ‘

The Bermondsey Poisoner (Penny Green Series Book 6)

Emily Organ Writer

4 weeks 2 days ago

I'm very excited to share the cover with you for Penny Green book 6! It will be published in December. I'll keep you posted when I know the exact date πŸŽ‰

Emily Organ Writer

1 month 2 days ago

Here's a landmark I'd LOVE to feature in the Penny Green series, but I can't! (yet). Do you recognise it? It's Tower Bridge under construction. The bridge was proposed in 1877 and needed to allow tall sail ships to pass beneath it - that's why the lower section can be raised. Construction took from 1886 until 1894. With the PG series currently set in 1884, the bridge is non-existent. It's worth a visit now though and the upper section has a glass walkway 😱

Emily Organ Writer

1 month 1 week ago

Euston station is another location in the forthcoming sixth PG book. This is the beautiful Great Hall at Euston Station which was built in 1837. The statue is of George Stephenson who the Victorians called 'Father of Railways'. The Great Hall was demolished in the 1950s to make way for the (very ugly) new station 😭. The Stephenson statue still survives and is in the National Railway Museum in York. I'm thinking there's a theme in some of these posts along the lines of London's Lost Treasures.

Photos from Emily Organ Writer's post

Emily Organ Writer

1 month 2 weeks ago

Penny Green book 6 features the enormous Doulton pottery factory in Lambeth (as in Royal Doulton). The showroom fronted the River Thames and what an incredible looking building it was! 🀯 Its ornamental style was designed to reflect the products the factory made. Sadly the building was targeted by bombs in WWII and was demolished in the 1950s. A small part of the pottery complex still stands, including Southbank House - its exterior gives you an idea of how beautiful some of these buildings were 😒.

Edited to add: my great grandmother lived just a few streets from here in the 1880s!

Emily Organ Writer

1 month 3 weeks ago

Writing descriptions of historical places requires a lot of research so I'm overjoyed to discover the Bermondsey Stink Map πŸ˜ƒ This is an illustration of what Bermondsey smelt like in bygone times - quite stomach churning apparently! πŸ’©

Bermondsey is one of the locations in the sixth Penny Green book. I could do with some stink maps for other parts of London too!

Pickle, Biscuits And Dog Poo: This Hand Drawn Map Shows The Smells Of Bermondsey

Emily Organ Writer

1 month 3 weeks ago

St James's Square features in Curse of the Poppy and has been an exclusive location in London for most of its history. Laid out in the 17th century, St James's Square has been home to three prime ministers, Nancy Astor, Ada Lovelace (pioneering mathematician and Lord Byron's daughter) and General Eisenhower's UK HQ in WWII.

These days the formerly fashionable townhouses are occupied by corporations, including BP and Rolex, a few private members clubs and the London Library. You can rent an apartment in St James's Square if you can afford Β£5,000+ a week in rent πŸ˜‚

Emily Organ Writer

2 months 2 days ago

Thank you for being patient paperback readers - Curse of the Poppy is out now in real life paper form! πŸ˜ƒπŸŽ‰πŸ‘

http://hyperurl.co/dl1cv5

Emily Organ Writer

2 months 1 week ago

The Ghazipur opium factory in Uttar Pradesh, India, features in Curse of the Poppy. The factory was established in 1820 by the British East India Company. Incredibly, the factory is still functioning almost 200 years later! It processes opium for alkaloid products in the pharmaceutical industry.